The Real IPCC

Investigating what THE PEOPLE JUDGE TO BE UNACCEPTABLE behaviour by the British police. Brought to you by real independent researchers and observers! "All human beings are born free and equal in dignity and rights. They are endowed with reason and conscience and should act towards one another in a spirit of brotherhood" – Article 1: The Universal Declaration of Human Rights.

Tag Archives: Death in Custody

Death in Custody: UK Protesters Call To Stop Cop Cruelty

Why has there never been a successful conviction of a police officers when members of the public die in police custody?

Death in Custody: UK Protesters Call To Stop Cop Cruelty

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Unlawful Killing Verdicts and Prosecutions

Unlawful killing verdicts and prosecutions

Click  on graph for detailed figures on Unlawful Killing Verdicts

All Statistics of deaths in custody.

The data below represents the number of unlawful killing verdicts and manslaughter or other serious prosecutions of state agents in cases of deaths in prison or in police custody or pursuits since 1990 that INQUEST is aware of.  The data is shown by the year the verdict was returned at an inquest or trial. Where no year is shown there were no unlawful killing verdicts returned. *

2006
Name Type Prosecution Inquest Verdict Ethnicity
Mikey Powell Police Custody Yes – ten officers tried for various offences – charges dropped for four officers at trial in June 2006, remainder acquitted August 2006 Yes Narrative UK Black
Robin Goodenough Police Custody Yes – three officers tried for manslaughter in 2005 – jury failed to reach verdict; retried for assault in 2006- acquitted No N/A UK White
2004
Name Type Prosecution Inquest Verdict Ethnicity
Harry Stanley Police Shooting No Yes Unlawful killing; overturned at Judicial Review, May 2005 UK White
2003
Name Type Prosecution Inquest Verdict Ethnicity
Roger Sylvester Police Custody No Yes Unlawful killing; quashed on a technicality UK Black
2002
Name Type Prosecution Inquest Verdict Ethnicity
Christopher Alder Police Custody 5 officers charged with manslaughter – trial collapsed 2002 Yes Unlawful killing Black
2001
Name Type Prosecution Inquest Verdict Ethnicity
James Ashley Police Shooting Yes – trial halted 2001 No N/A UK White
1998
Name Type Prosecution Inquest Verdict Ethnicity
Alton Manning Prison No yes Unlawful killing Black
1997
Name Type Prosecution Inquest Verdict Ethnicity
Ibrahima Sey Police Custody No Yes Unlawful killing Black
David Ewin Police Shooting Yes– acquitted at retrial 1997 No N/A UK White
1996
Name Type Prosecution Inquest Verdict Ethnicity
Shiji Lapite Police Custody No Yes Unlawful killing Black
1995
Name Type Prosecution Inquest Verdict Ethnicity
Richard O’Brien Police Custody Yes – acquitted at trial 1999 Yes Unlawful killing Irish
Joy Gardner Police / Immigration Yes – acquitted 1995 No N/A Black
1993
Name Type Prosecution Inquest Verdict Ethnicity
Leon Patterson Police Custody No Yes a) Unlawful killing quashed
b) new inquest 1996: “misadventure contributed to by neglect”
Black
Omasase Lumumba Prison No Yes Unlawful killing Black
1991
Name Type Prosecution Inquest Verdict Ethnicity
Oliver Pryce Police Custody No Yes Unlawful killing Black
Source: INQUEST casework and monitoring

* There has been a relatively recent increase in polce officers being charged with lesser offences following deaths in police custody. When more reliable information is available we will update the website.

There were also verdicts of Unlawful Killing returned at the inquest in 2003 into the deaths of two teenagers who died following a police pursuit in the Mersey Tunnel.

 

Source: http://inquest.gn.apc.org/website/statistics/unlawful-killing-verdicts

Christopher Alder – Killed in Police Custody

INQUEST
89-93 Fonthill Road, London N4 3JH
Phone: 020 7263 1111 Fax: 020 7561 0799
inquest@inquest.org.uk
http://www.inquest.org.uk

For immediate release 27 March 2006

DAMNING REPORT ON THE DEATH OF CHRISTOPHER ALDER FALLS
SHORT OF FAMILY’S DEMAND FOR PUBLIC INQUIRY

The IPPC today delivered its report into the death in police custody of Christopher Alder to Parliament. While welcoming the criticisms levelled at four of the five officers immediately involved in the events surrounding his death and who subsequently refused to co-operate with the IPCC Review, INQUEST and Christopher’s family are disappointed that both the IPCC and the Home Secretary Charles Clarke have resisted their call for a public inquiry into his death.

INQUEST has long highlighted the disproportionate number of deaths of young black men in police custody in circumstances involving medical neglect or the use of force. The IPCC Review recognises that racism played a part in Christopher’s death, and as the Chair of the IPCC Nick Hardwick commented “…I do believe the fact he was black stacked the odds more heavily against him,” and also that “…the officers’ neglect undoubtedly did deny him the chance of life”. His conclusion that the officers’ failure to actively assist Christopher meant that he “did not matter enough for them to do all they could to save him” is a
damning indictment in itself of their conduct and Nick Hardwick specifically considers the officers to be “guilty of the most serious neglect of duty”.

Despite two police investigations, an inquest, a criminal trial, an internal police disciplinary hearing and the review itself, Christopher’s family feel that they are still no closer to obtaining justice for his death. Speaking at a press conference after the report’s publication, Christopher’s sister Janet said:

The serious failings the report shows highlights the pressing need for further investigation and a public inquiry which could summon all those involved and through that I believe more evidence could be gained.

Deborah Coles, Co-director of INQUEST, said:

The public scandal of this shocking case is that the police officers who owed a duty of care to Christopher Alder have never publicly accounted for their actions on that night. Public confidence in the police will only be regained when the rule of law is seen to apply equally to those in uniform.

The full text of the report is available from the Home Office website at http://www.homeoffice.gov.uk .

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